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John Stossel: White guilt doesn’t help blacks November 25, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in African Americans, Blacks, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Discriminate, Discrimination, News, Racism, racism and discrimination, Racist, School, Shelby Steele, White Guilt, Whites.
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COMPLAINTS about racism dominate the media discussion of the disparity between black and white success in America. Comedian Chris Rock captures the prevailing sentiment between both races when he tells white audiences, “None of ya would change places with me and I’m rich! That’s how good it is to be white!”

A white author, Tim Wise (www.lipmagazine.org/~timwise/), gets applause from students on American campuses for talking about “white privilege.” Wise’s message is in huge demand — he does 80 speaking engagements a year. When we taped an appearance at Skidmore College, students of all races praised him as “eloquent,” “phenomenal,” and “so on point.”

But among some black intellectuals a new perspective has emerged, one that puts racism and “white privilege” low on the list of problems plaguing black Americans. Shelby Steele’s latest book, “White Guilt,” argues that whites do blacks no favors wringing their hands about white privilege.

“I grew up in segregation,” Steele said during my interview with him. “So I really know what racism is. I went to segregated school. I bow to no one in my knowledge of racism, which is one of the reasons why I say white privilege is not a problem.”

Steele claims, “The real problem is black irresponsibility,” which has produced high illegitimacy and high-school dropout rates that limit black progress. “Racism is about 18th on a list of problems that black America faces,” he says.

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Newspaper Editorial: “Facts in black, white” October 15, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in Blacks, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Civil Rights, Poor, poverty, Racial, Racism, Racist, Uncle Tom, White, White Guilt, Whites.
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Why not just go ahead and call me an Uncle Tom and a sellout? Why bother with trying to put a new coat of paint on the same old personal attacks by saying that I am “demeaning black people,” that I’m the “black Ann Coulter” and a turncoat against the cause of racial progress for black people in the United States?

That’s a sampling of the nastiness flying at me since I wrote a book that holds today’s civil-rights leaders accountable for serious problems inside black America. I’ve suggested that many poor people are capable of helping themselves by graduating high school, keeping a job and having children when they’re married and ready to be parents.

It is easier to attack me than to deal with some hard facts.

One hard, unforgiving fact is that 70 percent of black children are born today to single mothers. This is at the heart of the breakdown of the black family, the cornerstone of black life for generations. Some of these children without two parents may turn out just fine, but most add stress to the lives of their grandparents, neighbors, police and teachers who have to take up the slack for absent or bad parents.

It is easier to attack me than to deal with the hard fact of a dropout rate now at about 50 percent nationwide for black and Hispanic students. The average black student who gets a high school diploma today is reading and doing math at an eighth-grade level. Even with a diploma, that young person is ill-prepared to compete for entry-level jobs or for a college degree.

In an era of global economic competition – when it is harder to find a job, pay the rent and afford health insurance – there is little room to argue with the fact that it is a national crisis to find so many children of any race failing in school. But it is especially disturbing that so many of those children are black and Hispanic; they have the added burden of being people of color in a society in which race remains a real factor.

And what about the tragic fact of a 25 percent poverty rate among black Americans? That’s more than twice the 12 percent national poverty rate and more than triple the poverty rate among whites.

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White Guilt, Deciphered July 15, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in African-American, Black, Books, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Civil Rights, Discrimination, racial privilege, Racism, Shelby Steele, White, White Guilt.
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This week we printed a except from the book White Guilt. George F. Will of Newsweek goes on to give us a overview of what White Guilt is about and some history of “racial privilege”:

Black ‘militants’ preaching militant dependency want guilt-ridden whites to feel obligated to deliver black advancement.

By George F. Will
Newsweek

June 5, 2006 issue – The unbearable boredom occasioned by most of today’s talk about race is alleviated by a slender, stunning new book. In “White Guilt,” Shelby Steele, America’s most discerning black writer, casts a cool eye on yet another soft bigotry of low expectations—the ruinous “compassion” of a theory of social determinism that reduces blacks to, in Steele’s word, “non-individuated” creatures.

That reduction is the basis of identity politics—you are your (racial, ethnic, sexual) group. A pioneer of this politics, which is now considered “progressive,” was, Steele says, George Wallace. He, too, insisted that race is destiny.

The dehumanizing denial that blacks have sovereignty over their lives became national policy in 1965, when President Lyndon Johnson said: “You do not take a person who, for years, has been hobbled by chains and liberate him, bring him up to the starting line in a race and then say, ‘You are free to compete with all the others’.” This, Steele writes, enunciated a new social morality: No black problem could be defined as largely a black responsibility. If you were black, you could not be expected to carry responsibilities equal to others’.

So, being black conferred “an almost reckless moral authority,” a “power of racial privilege.” The “power to shame, silence and muscle concessions from the larger society” was black power. The demand for equal rights became a demand for “the redistribution of responsibility for black advancement from black to white America, from the ‘victims’ to the ‘guilty’.”

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Book: ‘White Guilt’: America’s race problem July 14, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in African-American, Book, Book: ‘White Guilt’, Books, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Guilt, race problem, Racism, Shelby Steele, White, White Guilt.
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Today Show:

Society treats African-Americans as victims, not equals. In his new book, Shelby Steele, a scholar on race issues, offers a solution.

Raise the issue of race in America and the topic will likely lead to a heated discussion. The same will happen if you read Shelby Steele’s “White Guilt: How Blacks and Whites Together Destroyed the Promise of the Civil Rights Era.” Steele, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, was invited on “Today” to discuss his book. Read an exerpt:

Chapter One
A Dilemma

Sometimes it is a banality — something a little sad and laughable — that makes you aware of a deep cultural change. On some level you already knew it, so that when the awareness comes, there is more recognition than surprise. Yes, of course, things have changed.
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So it was not long after the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal began that it occurred to me that race had dramatically changed the terms by which political power is won and held in America. When I woke on that January morning to the sight of President Clinton wagging his finger on the morning news and saying “I never had sex with that woman,” I thought two things: that he was lying and that he would be out of office within two weeks. It was a month later that I realized not only that he might survive his entire term but also that his survival, even for a month, already spoke volumes about the moral criterion for holding power in the United States.

I came to this realization on a drive back to northern California from Los Angeles with the scandal keeping me company on the car radio. A commentator said that President Eisenhower would not have survived a single day had he been caught in circumstances similar to President Clinton’s. Having grown up in the fifties, I thought this was probably true, and this is when the deep cultural shift became clear.

I seemed to remember — in the way that one vaguely remembers gossip about the famous —someone once telling me that Eisenhower occasionally used the word “nigger” on the golf course. Maybe he did; maybe he didn’t. In that era we blacks fully assumed that whites in all stations of life used this word at least in private. However, I cannot imagine that a reporter in that era, overhearing Eisenhower speak in this way, would have seen it as anything more than jocular bad taste. Certainly no one would have questioned his fitness to hold office. Yet, if an affair with a young female intern had exploded in the national media, with details of secret retreats off the Oval Office, thongs, cigars, etc., there is little doubt that 1950s America would have judged him morally unfit to hold power. It was taken for granted in that gray-flannel era that public trust had to be reciprocated by a rigorous decorum around sexual matters, even if that decorum was the very face of hypocrisy.

Yet, on that long drive talk-show callers passionately argued that private indiscretions were no bar to public trust, that what Clinton did in his private life had no bearing on his ability to run the country. It was unapologetic moral relativism — the idea that sexual morality is relative only to the consent of the individuals involved, and that there is no other authority or moral code larger than their choice. In the voices of many callers you could hear this expressed as a kind of pride. Relativism spares us from far worse sins, they seemed to be saying, those greatest of all sins for my baby-boomer generation — judgmentalism and hypocrisy.

All this drew me back to my college days in the sixties when we would sit around in the student union, smoking French cigarettes and arguing that monogamy was a passé bourgeois convention. Of course it was an adolescent argument of perfectly transparent wishful thinking, since beneath all the big ideas — at least for us boys — was the fervent hope that the girls would actually believe it. There was a lot of lust in this kind of thinking — lust everywhere in baby-boomer thinking — and over time it became part of the generational license that opened the way for a sexual revolution. But it was jarring these many decades later — so deep now into adult life — to hear such thinking hauled out in defense of the president of the United States.

But then something occurred to me. I wondered if President Clinton would be defended with relativism if he had done what, according to gossip, Eisenhower was said to have done. Suppose that in a light moment he had slipped into a parody of an old Arkansas buddy from childhood and, to get the voice right, used the word “nigger” a few times. Suppose further that a tape of this came to light so that all day long in the media — from the unctuous morning shows to the freewheeling late-night shows to the news every half hour on radio — we would hear the unmistakable presidential voice saying, “Take your average nigger … “

Today in America there is no moral relativism around racism, no sophisticated public sentiment that recasts racism as a mere quirk of character. Today America is puritanical rather than relativistic around racism, and if Clinton had been caught in this way, it is very likely that nothing would have saved him. The very legitimacy of the American democracy in this post–civil rights era now requires a rigid, if not repressive, morality of racial equality. A contribution of the civil rights movement was to establish the point that a multiracial society cannot be truly democratic unless social equality itself becomes a matter of personal morality. So a president’s “immorality” in this area would pretty much cancel his legitimacy as a democratic leader.

The point is that President Clinton survived what would certainly have destroyed President Eisenhower, and Eisenhower could easily have survived what would almost certainly have destroyed Clinton. Each man, finally, was no more than indiscreet within the moral landscape of his era (again, Eisenhower’s indiscretion is hypothetical here for purposes of discussion). Neither racism in the fifties nor womanizing in the nineties was a profound enough sin to undermine completely the moral authority of a president. So it was the good luck of each president to sin into the moral relativism of his era rather than into its puritanism. And, interestingly, the moral relativism of one era was the puritanism of the other. Race simply replaced sex as the primary focus of America’s moral seriousness.

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