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Female bosses are more likely to discriminate against female employees January 2, 2007

Posted by C.A.R.D in Card, Discriminate, Discrimination, female, male, Sexism, woman.
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FORGET “jobs for the boys”. Women bosses are significantly more likely than men to discriminate against female employees, research has suggested.

The study found that when presented with applications for promotion, women were more likely than men to assess the female candidate as less qualified than the male one.

They were also prone to mark down women’s prospects for promotion and to assess them as more controlling than men in their management style.

The findings, based on experiments carried out among more than 700 people, suggest that the “queen bee syndrome” of female rivalry in the workplace may sometimes be as important as sexism in holding back women’s careers.



Editorial: Sexism in video games November 29, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Discriminate, Discrimination, female, male, Sexism, Sexist, Women.
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“The portrayal of women in video games is disgusting.”

That’s a quotation I’ve heard many times, from both men and women alike. The truth is that they have a point. Most of the time, female avatars are portrayed with large breasts, small waistlines and finely toned bodies all around. Commonly, the blame for this is put on the fact that “sex sells” and game development is a male dominated industry.

The theory is that the perception of a predominantly male audience wants to see gorgeous female toons when they’re playing a game. That’s why, so it’s said, that the game’s developers create unrealistic, fantasy women to populate their worlds. Let’s face it, when’s the last time you were playing a game and came across a female toon that was anything less than “ideal” unless it was a plot point?

Video games certainly aren’t a new addition to this pop-culture phenomenon. Look anywhere: television, magazines, billboards, etc. They all show us unrealistic representations that really can and do cause real women, young and old, to feel inferior and imperfect in society. This can lead to feelings of depression, eating disorders and any number of other things.


The New Gender War October 3, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, female, gender, male, Sexism, Sexist, TV.
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Feminism has drawn attention to and fought against stereotypical and sexist portrayals of women in mass media, but new research shows that media portrayals of gender have largely done an about face in the past decade or so. There is a new “gender war” and the main target of discrimination is no longer women, according to research – it is men.

Gender studies have claimed that mass media portrayals and images are key influences that both reflect and shape society’s views of women and women’s self-identity. As well as attacking obvious sexist media portrayals such as page three girls and “girlie” magazines, feminists have challenged objectification, marginalisation, trivialisation and other negative portrayals of women in movies, advertising, TV drama and other media content. Their argument that such portrayals are damaging have won support from legislators and from many media professionals including film makers, advertising producers and editors.

Research shows that, while sexism against women remains, representations of women have evolved with less stereotypical portrayals and more women shown in heroic, successful, independent and sexually liberated roles such as in Buffy and the Vampire Slayer, Sex and the City and even in aggressive roles such as Kill Bill.

A 1995-96 study reported in a 2002 book, Media, Gender and Identity by media researcher David Gauntlett, found 43 per cent of major characters in TV shows were women – up from 18 per cent in 1992-93. The study reported that, on a character-by-character basis, females and males were equal in all criteria studied. Analysis of newspapers and magazines also has found portrayals of women improving – albeit there is still a way to go in some areas according to feminist scholars.

Until recently, gender theorists and media researchers have argued or assumed that media representations of men are predominantly positive, or at least unproblematic. Men have allegedly been shown in mass media as powerful, dominant, heroic, successful, respected, independent and in other positive ways conducive to men and boys maintaining a healthy self-identity and self-esteem.

However, this view has come under challenge over the past few years. John Beynon, a Welsh cultural studies academic, examined how masculinity was portrayed in the British quality press including The Times, The Guardian and The Sunday Times over a three-year period from 1999-2001 and in books such as Susan Faludi’s 2000 best-seller Stiffed: The Betrayal of Modern Man. Beynon concluded in his 2002 book, Masculinities and Culture, that men and masculinity were overwhelmingly presented negatively and as “something dangerous to be contained, attacked, denigrated or ridiculed, little else”.

Canadian authors, Paul Nathanson and Katherine Young in a controversial 2001 book, Spreading Misandry: The Teaching of Contempt for Men in Popular Culture reported widespread examples of “laughing at men, looking down on men, blaming men, de-humanising men, and demonising men” in modern mass media. They concluded: “… the worldview of our society has become increasingly both gynocentric (focused on the needs and problems of women) and misandric (focused on the evils and inadequacies of men)”.


Coed Citadel Still A Work In Progress August 14, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in alcohol abuse, assimilation, cadet corps, Card, Citadel, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, coed, college, Discrimination, honor code, legal, male, minority, racism and discrimination, Sexual harassment, sexually assaulted, Tara Woodside, U.S. Air Force Academy, West Point, woman.
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Ten years ago, The Citadel threw open its doors to women after a protracted, heated legal fight. On Saturday, a new class of 650 freshmen — including about 40 women — arrive. But the challenge of bringing women into the once all-male cadet corps isn’t over. Some male cadets and alumni still don’t like the idea.

“There will always be pockets of people who don’t want a coed school,” said Nancy Mace Jackson, the college’s first female cadet graduate.

Tara Woodside, a junior from Salem, N.J., was in grade school when Jackson arrived on campus.

“There are some guys who are skeptical at first,” Woodside said. “But once a woman proves herself, they are your biggest supporters.”

One of the biggest difficulties is attracting more women, who now make up 6% of the cadet corps. During the past decade, 129 female cadets have graduated, and this year there will be nearly 130 women among the college’s almost 2,000 cadets.


Schools Sexist Towards Boys? July 21, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in Anglin, Boys, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Discriminate, Discrimination, Doug Anglin, honor roll, John Drottar, male, Milton High, Milton High School, Racism, School, Schools, Sexism, Sexist.
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At Milton High School, girls outnumber boys by almost 2 to 1 on the honor roll. In Advanced Placement classes, almost 60 percent of the students are female.

It’s not that girls are smarter than boys, said Doug Anglin, a 17-year-old senior at the high school.
Girls are outperforming boys because the school system favors them, said Anglin, who has filed a federal civil rights complaint contending that his school discriminates against boys.


Sexual harassment of men revealed July 18, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Discrimination, female, harassment, male, managers, Sexism, Sexual harassment, stereotype, survey.
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A hidden world of sexual harassment, with female managers exploiting their power over men in the office, has been unveiled by a new government survey.

Despite the common stereotype of the male executive putting pressure on his secretary, two in five victims of sexual harassment are men, the study found.

A quarter of the men questioned in the Department of Trade and Industry survey reported being pestered by a client whom they also felt obliged to please.

According to the Equal Opportunities Commission, 8 per cent of calls to its sexual harassment helpline are from men, even though research shows male victims are less likely than women to complain. It insists that male complaints should be taken just as seriously. ‘It affects both women and men, causing stress, health problems and financial penalties when they leave their jobs to avoid it,’ said Jenny Watson, chair of the EOC.