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Discriminating Lenders, or Just Discrimination? May 20, 2007

Posted by C.A.R.D in African Americans, African-American, American Indians, Black, Blacks, Card, civil rights law, ethnic group discrimination, Fair Housing Act, fair-housing complaints, housing discrimination, housing racism, Indian reservations, Lawsuit, lender discrimination, mortgage discrimination, mortgage loans, National Community Reinvestment Coalition, Native Americans, NovaStar Financial, NovaStar Financial discrimination, people with disabilities, racism discrimination, Richard Johnson, The National Community Reinvestment Coalition.
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When mortgage lenders refuse to write loans on central-city rowhouses, does that violate federal fair-housing rules?

What about refusing to write mortgages on houses in a community dominated by an ethnic group? Or not offering mortgage loans for houses that may be used in part to accommodate disabled adults?

Just how much protection do fair-lending and other civil rights laws provide to mortgage applicants who are rejected not because of their credit scores or financial capacities but possibly because of the location, type or potential use of their homes?

A major consumer group is mounting a campaign aimed at nailing down the answers. The National Community Reinvestment Coalition filed lawsuit May 9 against NovaStar Mortgage, a subsidiary of publicly traded NovaStar Financial, based in Kansas City, Mo. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in the District, charges that NovaStar has repeatedly violated the Fair Housing Act by refusing to offer mortgages on rowhouses in downtown Baltimore, on homes on Indian reservations anywhere in the country, and on houses that may be used in part to shelter and care for disabled adults.

Such bans have “no business justification,” according to the suit, and illegally discriminate against African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and people with disabilities.

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American Indian Athletes Play Through Racism January 30, 2007

Posted by C.A.R.D in American Indian, American Indian Athletes, American Indians, anti-American Indian, Discriminate, Discrimination, Discrimination against American Indians, Racism, Racism towards American Indians, Racist, Wyoming Indian High School.
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Athletes and coaches at Wyoming Indian High School say racism is nothing new for them when they’re playing teams in other towns.

A couple years ago, the Chiefs basketball team had played in Mountain View and were leaving a restaurant when someone in a passing car shouted “go back to the rez.”

Other incidents are less clear-cut. The girls basketball team was recently told at a truck stop in Worland that they couldn’t use the bathrooms there. Coach Aleta Moss says a cart was pushed in front of the restroom door as soon as the team arrived.


A supervisor at the truck stop said later that the team wasn’t allowed in because the restrooms had just flooded. Still, Moss says she interprets the incident as racism.

Still other times, team members are followed around stores to make sure they don’t shoplift.

Ron Laird is commissioner of the Wyoming High School Activities Association. He says his office hasn’t received any reports of racism at high school events this school year.

He says schools in Wyoming usually do a good job of addressing racist incidents quickly.

C.a.r.d {Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination} Source: kgwn.tv

Tackling welfare’s racial gap January 23, 2007

Posted by C.A.R.D in African Americans, African-American, American Indian, American Indians, Asian, Blacks, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Hispanic, minorities, White, Whites.
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Counties are under pressure to get more black and American Indian families off of assistance or risk losing a chunk of federal money.

Sixteen counties across Minnesota have resolved to get more black and American Indian families off state welfare this year.

It’s a goal that may sound surprisingly blunt, but public agencies call it staggering in its complexity. Not only are black and American Indian families hugely overrepresented on welfare rolls, but recent studies show those groups, overall, also remain on public assistance longer than whites, Asians, Hispanics and Somali immigrants.

In suburban counties, officials say the growing number of low-income minorities migrating from urban areas has added a sensitive racial dimension to an old challenge of meeting the needs of the poor.

“The goal that the state has given us is that African-Americans and Native Americans should be doing as well as everyone else,” said Ruth Krueger, who directs Dakota County’s Department of Employment and Economic Assistance.

“Our overarching goal is to get everyone off welfare,” she said. “We don’t want to find that there is one group that is being left behind on that.”

And there’s little time. Millions of dollars for needy families could be at stake.

The U.S. Deficit Reduction Act signed into law last year requires that states get half of family-welfare recipients involved in jobs or job-related programs for at least 30 hours a week or they risk losing a share of federal help. Currently, about a third of Minnesota’s welfare families meet that goal.

To calculate progress, the law no longer provides states with credit for families that have moved off welfare entirely.

If Minnesota’s numbers don’t improve by 2009, the state could lose $13.5 million of the $267 million it receives from the federal government each year to help poor families make ends meet.

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Racial discrimination OK — if it’s for racial Hawaiian natives December 6, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in American Indians, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Discriminate, Discrimination, Racism, Racist, White.
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SAN FRANCISCO – A private school in Hawaii can favor Hawaiian natives for admission as a means of giving a helping hand to a downtrodden indigenous population, a divided federal appeals court ruled Tuesday.

In Tuesday‘s decision, the majority noted that the case was unique because Congress has singled out the plight of native Hawaiians for improvement, just as lawmakers have done with Alaskan natives and American Indians.

Admission to the elite school is first granted to qualified Hawaiian students, and non-Hawaiians may be admitted if there are openings available.

The case was brought by a white student excluded because of his race.

The Kamehameha Schools were established under the 1883 will of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop as part of a trust now worth about $6.8 billion.

The decision came a day after the Supreme Court suggested during arguments in a different case that it might ban the practice of race-based admissions in public schools, even if the policy was intended to create racial harmony.

But the court that same year also permitted colleges to consider race as part of a “holistic review” of every application.

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NO: Schools teach students wrong lesson on discrimination December 5, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in admissions, American Indians, Black, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Civil Rights, court, Discriminate, Discrimination, Diversity, Lawsuit, minority, racism and discrimination, White.
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In 2000, Seattle public school officials told nearly 100 minority students in the eighth grade they couldn’t attend the high school of their choice. There was only one reason for the decision: the students’ skin color. They weren’t white.

For 200 white students, the news was the same: they couldn’t go to the high school of their choice because of their skin color.

Despite decades of advancement in our country on civil rights, some government officials wrongly insist that people should be judged on the color of their skin. In Seattle, despite racially diverse neighborhoods and schools, officials took it upon themselves to decide that certain schools weren’t “white” enough or “minority” enough.

The school district and hundreds of other school districts around the country do so in the name of “diversity,” a nice word that attempts to gloss over the wrong lesson for our children. If we don’t want our children to judge people based on the color of their skin, why are educators doing just that?

On Dec. 4, the U.S. Supreme Court will have a chance to tell school officials around the country that it is morally wrong — and unconstitutional — for them to discriminate against students based on their race.

The court will hear two cases brought by concerned parents from Seattle and Louisville, Ky., who objected to their children being turned away at schoolhouse doors simply because their skin was the wrong color.

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A Revisionist Thanksgiving: Teaching Racial Conflict To Students November 23, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in American Indians, Card, Discriminate, Discrimination, Racism, Racist, Tribe.
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LONG BEACH, Calif. | Teacher Bill Morgan walked into his third-grade class wearing a black Pilgrim hat and began taking pencils, backpacks and glue sticks from his pupils.

He told them the items now belonged to him because he “discovered” them.

Morgan is among elementary school teachers who have ditched the traditional Thanksgiving lesson, in which children dress up like Indians and Pilgrims and act out their first meetings. He has replaced it with a more realistic look at the complex relationship between Indians and white settlers.

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Minority contracting up since affirmative action abolished November 14, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in affirmative action, African Americans, American Indians, Bush, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, minority, reverse racism, Women.
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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Governor Jeb Bush says the state’s spending on contracts with businesses owned by minority group members and women has nearly tripled since he abolished affirmative action nearly eight years ago.

A record 761-point-2 million dollars was spent with certified minority and female-owned contractors in the last budget year, which ended June 30. According to the governor’s office, that’s 497 million dollars — or 189 percent — more than for the 1998-99 budget year.

The spending total includes 135-point-3 million dollars in contracts with African Americans, 158-point-8 million dollars with Hispanics, 45 million dollars with Asian Americans, 11-point-2 million dollars with American Indians and 410 million dollars with non-minority women.

Bush in 1999 did away with affirmative action programs for state contracting and university admission that gave minority group members a race-based edge and replaced it with his “One Florida” initiative.

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Indians challenge use of ‘Redskins’ name August 15, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in American Indians, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Football, Indians Fight Redskins Name, Morning Star Institute, Native American Journalists Association, NFL, Petition, racially offensive, Redskins trademark, Suzan Shown Harjo, Washington, Washington Redskins.
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American Indians have filed a new legal challenge to the Washington Redskins’ trademark, contending the NFL team’s name is racially offensive, speakers at the Native American Journalists Association national convention said Friday.

A petition to cancel the trademark was filed Friday with a board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Washington.

“There is no compromise with racism,” Suzan Shown Harjo, president of the Morning Star Institute, said at the conference. The institute is a Washington-based non-profit organization that advances Indian causes.

“Power concedes nothing,” she said. “You have to go in and make change happen.”

The patent office’s Trademark Trial and Appeal Board backed a similar petition filed in 1992. That decision was overturned on appeal, but the door was left open for another attempt to invalidate the trademark, Harjo said.

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