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Bid To Eliminate Anti-White “Reverse Racism” From The Justice System. October 5, 2006

Posted by C.A.R.D in Anti-White, Card, Citizens Against Racism and Discrimination, Murder, Racism, Racist, reverse racism.
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Australia – Murderers in the Northern Territory will find it harder to plead manslaughter under reforms designed to eliminate “reverse racism” from the justice system.

As foreshadowed by The Australian last month, Attorney-General Syd Stirling yesterday announced changes to the Criminal Code following concerns about the high rate of convictions in the Territory for lesser charges instead of murder.

Mr Stirling said the reforms, to be introduced in parliament this month, would remove drunkenness and any reference to cultural or ethnic backgrounds as partial defences to murder.

“The amendments will ensure that those who commit murder are convicted of murder,” Mr Stirling said.

The Northern Territory has the nation’s highest murder rate, with the majority of homicides involving Aboriginal people, alcohol and domestic violence.

In the 10 years since 1996, there have been just 12 indigenous people in the Territory convicted of murder compared with 62 for manslaughter.

Over the same period, 24 people have been convicted for dangerous acts causing death and 23 for doing a dangerous act causing death while intoxicated.


But the changes were attacked by Sharon Payne, head of the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency, who said removing the need to prove intent represented a “return to the Middle Ages”.

“Under homicide rules, you really have to prove an intent to kill. The onus has to be on the Crown to prove that they (the offenders) intended to kill.”

The reforms come one month after a coronial inquest in Darwin highlighted the circumstances leading up to the brutal death of Jodie Palipuaminni, a 27-year-old Aboriginal woman from the Tiwi Islands who was killed by her husband, Trenton Cunningham, in May last year.

Northern Territory legal figures have questioned why Cunningham was convicted for manslaughter, not murder, since no alcohol was involved in the crime and the killer was breaching the conditions of his parole at the time.

Cunningham, who had inflicted 11 years of horrific abuse on his wife before he finally killed her, was originally charged with murder but faced court for manslaughter.

In August, he was sentenced in the Northern Territory Supreme Court to 11 1/2 years behind bars, with a non-parole period of 6 1/2 years. Mr Stirling said too many offenders had previously been able to get away with lesser charges than murder.

“I’ve always … thought that there’s been somewhat of a reverse racism-type element in law,” he said.

Under the reforms, the defence of diminished responsibility will be clarified, with new provisions for defence to focus on the accused’s ability to understand events and determine whether their actions were right or wrong.

Mr Stirling said the charge of “dangerous act” would also be abolished to ensure offenders were “appropriately charged”.

“Offenders will face the full arm of the law,” he said.

Source: The Australian

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